Leonard Nimoy on a Flag Pole

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potato3unicorn097:

imacatmiaow:

idonotlikethatsam-i-am:

matafari:

Reason number 3457398735973495 why I love Pink

Respect.

I forgot that Pink’s name isn’t actually Pink

Pink is one of my idols

(via 13radishes)

andthebluestblue:

stop saying “his or her”

use their

piss off prescriptivists
acknowledge nonbinary identities
make your sentences less clunky
advocate for common usage which is what leads to grammatical acceptance 

(via emberjams)

dirtybrian:

polytropic-liar:

kateelliottsff:

jenniferrpovey:

wintersoldierfell:

ohhaiguise:

  (x)

Okay, but this movie wins the award for Best Use of Manpain, tho.

In any other movie, Raleigh would’ve spent 90 minutes being like MY PAIN IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN YOUR STUPID WAR, and instead, he snaps back into action as soon as he meets Mako. That’s awesome. But what floors me is that he uses his own grief to help Mako survive hers. He knows how awful it is to lose your family. He knows what she’s going through. And instead of whining or thinking his pain makes him entitled to opt out of his responsibilities, he empathizes with Mako, supports her, and encourages her.

Raleigh’s greatest strength is his compassion. And that’s the kind of male hero I’d like to see on my screen, please.

Plus, like, a bazillion more movies about Mako Mori.

I have a friend who thinks Pacific Rim is the best expression of true, non-toxic, GOOD masculinity in recent times.

All agreement.

Let’s talk about Stacker Pentecost in light of this, though. Because we learn, towards the end of the movie, that the day he met Mako is the day he lost his partner. He gets out of that jaeger after having piloted it alone, after having his body burned for hours by toxic radiation, after losing the person he was mentally linked to (family? partner? friend?) and what does he do? He adopts a young girl, and more than that, he promises her her right to revenge if that’s what she wants. Tries his best to keep her safe but gives her the tools and skills and support and eventually permission to fight. Respects her enough to rely on her. Gives her a home and family and meaningful, important vocation during the goddamn apocalypse. Let’s talk about the kind of masculinity that uplifts others that completely. That takes all kinds of pain and stands up in the face of it because of the people who need to see him still standing. That has purpose and drive and passion but above all understands other people and believes in them.

Stacker fucking Pentecost everybody.

I have a friend who thinks Pacific Rim is the best expression of true, non-toxic, GOOD masculinity in recent times.

^ THIS.

(via cptprocrastination)

tamorapierce:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

This is the most amazing thing!  Little sisters heck!  Have you got nieces, granddaughters, cousins, daughters?  Not only girls of color can benefit by having dolls like these, but white girls who are growing up in a world of color!

corgisandboobs:

cuntwrap-supr3m3:

mirror:

If women catcalled men (X)

Bet those arms could put together my IKEA furniture… New pick up line forever.

The shit people say to women on the street is disgusting and wrong, but I’m not gonna lie…I would greatly like to hear one of these lines sometime in my life.

(via cptprocrastination)

snoochtothedooch:

nubbsgalore:

during the autumn rutting season, red deer stag find themselves with elaborate bracken crowns from having rubbed their heads against the ground, which they do to strengthen their neck muscles so as to help them in battle with those competing for the affections of the does. photos by (click pic) mark smith, toby melville, luke millward and greg morgan in london’s richmond park. (see also: more autumn rut in richmond park)

I AM THE KING OF THE FOREST

(via cptprocrastination)

deducecanoe:

8m57w6:

ashtonjpage:

passiveimagination:

My mom teaches Kindergarten and I went to her classroom a few days ago and saw what appeared to be a small shrine dedicated to Jodie Foster in the corner of the room and I had literally no idea why it was there, so I asked my mom about it and she said it’s where the kids can go to tattle on each other so they don’t always do it to her

So basically my mom tells her little Kindergarteners to tell on each other to a magazine clipping of Jodie Foster that they call Miss Tattle and if you don’t think that’s the funniest thing then get out of my face

OMG, I can’t.

 Oh man yeah this is a super common thing, we have one of these in my preschool room, too, except ours is a picture of Obama. When the kids are upset or angry or want to tattle or whatever they “Go tell the President” and its my favorite thing.

GO TELL THE PRESIDENT

(via cptprocrastination)

oukamiyoukai45
wood wolves

(via cryptovolans)

themomerath:

Can we talk about how on point this tweet is

(via cptprocrastination)

rate-my-reptile:

butthurtherpetologist:

You seem to have dropped your long dogs there.

Weallacome to the RIBBONZ PARTY 9.7/10 (flapps Long Boddy in the breese)

(via arthulian)

pseudocon:

So I went to see The Book of Life today…

It was really cute!  I’ve been in love with La Muerte’s design since I first saw it, so here she is. uvu

(via pumpkinsbeard)

wolf playing in the snow

(via cryptovolans)

pyopyon:

silent3:

throwingshadepodcast:

What year is this

x / x

There’s a reason I hated that sappy, watery, pathetic book. Now I know what it is.

is it REALLY surprising considering his books are so white you couldn’t bleach anything out of them

(via arthulian)

tamorapierce:

profeminist:

From the always amazing and on-target Laci Green. In ”Five Things Everyone Should Know About Slut Shame This Halloween,” she breaks it down: 
1. Calling women sluts/whores/skanks is a form of sexism.
2. Slut shame limits women’s freedom.
3. Slut shame is one of the ways women compete with each other for male approval.
4. Slut shame is a form of bullying.
5. Slut shame leads to rape, sexual assault, and sexual violence.
“This Halloween (and always) be a good person.  Respect women, respect their choices, and check yourself when you find yourself thinking or saying someone is a slut.  It’s a deeply held attitude about women that we all learn from our sexist culture, and it is vital that we all take the time to unlearn it.  These attitudes are more vicious and dangerous than they might appear.”
Read More: Five Things Everyone Should Know About Slut Shame This Halloween

I hate slut and related words like I hate b***h and any other word that slams women.  Anyone who knows me knows I don’t want to hear these words spoken around me.  We are not each other’s enemy; we do not need to trash one another to gain male approval.  If we feel we have to compete for a man, chances are he isn’t worth competing for, not if it means belittling a sister.  We should work together, not tear at each other.  It’s the only way we’ll all get ahead.  When women trash each other, only men gain.

tamorapierce:

profeminist:

From the always amazing and on-target Laci GreenIn Five Things Everyone Should Know About Slut Shame This Halloween,” she breaks it down: 

1. Calling women sluts/whores/skanks is a form of sexism.

2. Slut shame limits women’s freedom.

3. Slut shame is one of the ways women compete with each other for male approval.

4. Slut shame is a form of bullying.

5. Slut shame leads to rape, sexual assault, and sexual violence.

This Halloween (and always) be a good person.  Respect women, respect their choices, and check yourself when you find yourself thinking or saying someone is a slut.  It’s a deeply held attitude about women that we all learn from our sexist culture, and it is vital that we all take the time to unlearn it.  These attitudes are more vicious and dangerous than they might appear.”

Read MoreFive Things Everyone Should Know About Slut Shame This Halloween

I hate slut and related words like I hate b***h and any other word that slams women.  Anyone who knows me knows I don’t want to hear these words spoken around me.  We are not each other’s enemy; we do not need to trash one another to gain male approval.  If we feel we have to compete for a man, chances are he isn’t worth competing for, not if it means belittling a sister.  We should work together, not tear at each other.  It’s the only way we’ll all get ahead.  When women trash each other, only men gain.